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  Dysentery  
 
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Contributing risk factors | Recommendations

 

Dysentery is a disease involving the inflammation of the lining of the large intestine. The inflammation causes stomach pains and diarrhea and In some cases may involve vomiting and fever. The bacteria responsible for this acute infection enters the body through the mouth in food or water which has been contaminated by human feces. The diarrhea causes people suffering from dysentery to lose important salts and fluids from the body. This can be fatal if the body dehydrates and it is important to get prompt treatment, especially in children.
 

 
 

Risk factors for Dysentery:
 
 
Symptoms - Gas-Int - Conditions  History of dysentary
 
 

Recommendations for Dysentery:
 
 
Drug  Antibiotics

Lab Tests/Rule-Outs

  Test for Microbiological Imbalance, Stool
 
 


KEY
Strong or generally accepted link
Highly recommended







GLOSSARY

Acute:  An illness or symptom of sudden onset, which generally has a short duration.

Bacteria:  Microscopic germs. Some bacteria are "harmful" and can cause disease, while other "friendly" bacteria protect the body from harmful invading organisms.

Diarrhea:  Excessive discharge of contents of bowel.

Dysentery:  An inflammatory disorder of the lower intestinal tract, usually caused by a bacterial, parasitic, or protozoan infection and resulting in pain, fever, and severe diarrhea, often accompanied by the passage of blood and mucous.

Stomach:  A hollow, muscular, J-shaped pouch located in the upper part of the abdomen to the left of the midline. The upper end (fundus) is large and dome-shaped; the area just below the fundus is called the body of the stomach. The fundus and the body are often referred to as the cardiac portion of the stomach. The lower (pyloric) portion curves downward and to the right and includes the antrum and the pylorus. The function of the stomach is to begin digestion by physically breaking down food received from the esophagus. The tissues of the stomach wall are composed of three types of muscle fibers: circular, longitudinal and oblique. These fibers create structural elasticity and contractibility, both of which are needed for digestion. The stomach mucosa contains cells which secrete hydrochloric acid and this in turn activates the other gastric enzymes pepsin and rennin. To protect itself from being destroyed by its own enzymes, the stomach’s mucous lining must constantly regenerate itself.