The Analyst™

Comprehensive diagnosis of your symptoms

Healthy

  Vitamin E Requirement  
 
Search treatments and conditions
Conditions that suggest it | Contributing risk factors | Recommendations

 

Although vitamin E deficiency is rare in humans, its signs and symptoms include dry skin, easy bruising, decreased clotting time, eczema, elevated indirect bilirubin, psoriasis, elevated heavy metals, PMS, cystic fibrosis, sickle cell anemia, beta thalassemia, cataracts, fibrocystic disease, benign prostatic hypertrophy, poor wound healing, hot flashes, growing pains and Osgood-Schlatter disease.
 

 
 

Conditions that suggest Vitamin E Requirement:
 
 
Musculo-Skeletal  Osgood-Schlatter Disease
  Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS) / Periodic Limb Moveme
 
 

Risk factors for Vitamin E Requirement:
 
 
Childhood  History of Osgood-Schlatter disease

Digestion

  Steatorrhea / Fat Malabsorption

Habits

  Aerobic Exercise Need
 One study showed that people with a low physical activity level had a lower reserve of vitamin E than those more highly active. Vitamin E concentration was inversely related to abdominal circumference. The inverse relationship between tocopherol levels and levels of body fat may explain why this is a risk factor for coronary heart disease, due to vitamin E's role as an antioxidant and protective agent in cardiovascular disease. [Journal of Internal Medicine, 1993;234: pp.53-60]

Organ Health

  Consequences of Gallbladder Surgery

Supplements and Medications

  Iron supplementation
 Inorganic iron binds with vitamin E and inactivates it. Consider taking separately or using an organic form.

  Absence of supplemental vitamin E

Counter-indicators:
  Multiple vitamin supplement use
  High/low/moderate dose vitamin E use

Symptoms - Food - Intake

  Vegetable oil consumption
 As the amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids increases in the diet, Vitamin E requirements increase proportionally.

  High/moderate Omega-3 oil intake
 As the amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids increases in the diet, Vitamin E requirements increase proportionally.

Symptoms - Gas-Int - General

  Having had a small bowel resection
 Ileal resection can lead to malabsorption of both divalent cations (such as calcium and magnesium) and fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and vitamin K.

Symptoms - Metabolic

  Pancreas mostly/pancreas completely removed
 
 

Recommendations for Vitamin E Requirement:
 
 
Vitamins  Vitamin E
 
 


KEY
Weak or unproven link
Strong or generally accepted link
Strongly counter-indicative
Very strongly or absolutely counter-indicative
Likely to help







GLOSSARY

Anemia:  A condition resulting from an unusually low number of red blood cells or too little hemoglobin in the red blood cells. The most common type is iron-deficiency anemia in which the red blood cells are reduced in size and number, and hemoglobin levels are low. Clinical symptoms include shortness of breath, lethargy and heart palpitations.

Antioxidant:  A chemical compound that slows or prevents oxygen from reacting with other compounds. Some antioxidants have been shown to have cancer-protecting potential because they neutralize free radicals. Examples include vitamins C and E, alpha lipoic acid, beta carotene, the minerals selenium, zinc, and germanium, superoxide dismutase (SOD), coenzyme Q10, catalase, and some amino acids, like cystiene. Other nutrient sources include grape seed extract, curcumin, gingko, green tea, olive leaf, policosanol and pycnogenol.

Benign:  Literally: innocent; not malignant. Often used to refer to cells that are not cancerous.

Calcium:  The body's most abundant mineral. Its primary function is to help build and maintain bones and teeth. Calcium is also important to heart health, nerves, muscles and skin. Calcium helps control blood acid-alkaline balance, plays a role in cell division, muscle growth and iron utilization, activates certain enzymes, and helps transport nutrients through cell membranes. Calcium also forms a cellular cement called ground substance that helps hold cells and tissues together.

Cardiovascular:  Pertaining to the heart and blood vessels.

Cataract:  A steadily worsening disease of the eye in which the lens becomes cloudy as a result of the precipitation of proteins. Most cataracts are caused by the functions of the body breaking down. Eye trauma, such as from a puncture wound, may also result in cataracts.

Cystic Fibrosis:  (CF) An incurable genetic disease involving a sticky buildup of mucus in the lungs (which makes breathing difficult and leads to infections), as well as pancreatic insufficiency (which leads to digestive problems). Symptoms include chronic cough producing thick mucus, excessive appetite combined with weight loss, intestinal disorders, salty sweat/skin and pneumonia. Lung-related problems are the most frequent cause of death. CF is a recessive disease, occurring only when a person inherits two mutated copies of the CF gene - one from each parent. Individuals with CF generally have a life expectancy of about 30 years.

Eczema:  Swelling of the outer skin of unknown cause. In the early stage it may be itchy, red, have small blisters, and be swollen, and weeping. Later it becomes crusted, scaly, and thickened.

Fatty Acids:  Chemical chains of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms that are part of a fat (lipid) and are the major component of triglycerides. Depending on the number and arrangement of these atoms, fatty acids are classified as either saturated, polyunsaturated, or monounsaturated. They are nutritional substances found in nature which include cholesterol, prostaglandins, and stearic, palmitic, linoleic, linolenic, eicosapentanoic (EPA), and decohexanoic acids. Important nutritional lipids include lecithin, choline, gamma-linoleic acid, and inositol.

Growing Pains:  Unexplainable pain, usually in the legs, that occurs in growing children and is not accompanied by swelling or any other symptoms. Treatment includes massage and rest. The problem is distinguishing this pain from that caused by more serious problems: even physicians often have difficulty knowing how many laboratory and X-ray tests to perform.

Hypertrophy:  Increase in the size of an organ due to enlargement of its cells; frequently with a corresponding increase in functional capacity.

Iron:  An essential mineral. Prevents anemia: as a constituent of hemoglobin, transports oxygen throughout the body. Virtually all of the oxygen used by cells in the life process are brought to the cells by the hemoglobin of red blood cells. Iron is a small but most vital, component of the hemoglobin in 20,000 billion red blood cells, of which 115 million are formed every minute. Heme iron (from meat) is absorbed 10 times more readily than the ferrous or ferric form.

Magnesium:  An essential mineral. The chief function of magnesium is to activate certain enzymes, especially those related to carbohydrate metabolism. Another role is to maintain the electrical potential across nerve and muscle membranes. It is essential for proper heartbeat and nerve transmission. Magnesium controls many cellular functions. It is involved in protein formation, DNA production and function and in the storage and release of energy in ATP. Magnesium is closely related to calcium and phosphorus in body function. The average adult body contains approximately one ounce of magnesium. It is the fifth mineral in abundance within the body--behind calcium, phosphorus, potassium and sodium. Although about 70 percent of the body's magnesium is contained in the teeth and bones, its most important functions are carried out by the remainder which is present in the cells of the soft tissues and in the fluid surrounding those cells.

Osgood-Schlatter Disease:  One of the most common causes of knee pain in young athletes. It causes swelling, pain and tenderness just below the knee, at the top of the shin bone (tibia). It occurs mostly in boys who are having a growth spurt. One or both knees may be affected.

Polyunsaturated:  Polyunsaturated fats or oils. Originate from vegetables and are liquid at room temperature. These oils are a good source of the unsaturated fatty acids. They include flaxseed with added vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), sunflower oil, safflower oil, and primrose oil.

Premenstrual Syndrome:  PMS consists of various physical and/or emotional symptoms that occur in the second half of the menstrual cycle, after ovulation. The symptoms begin about midcycle, are generally the most intense during the last seven days before menstruation and include: acne; backache; bloating; fatigue; headache; sore breasts; changes in sexual desire; depression; difficulty concentrating; difficulty handling stress; irritability; tearfulness.

Psoriasis:  An inherited skin disorder in which there are red patches with thick, dry silvery scales. It is caused by the body making too-many skin cells. Sores may be anywhere on the body but are more common on the arms, scalp, ears, and the pubic area. A swelling of small joints may go along with the skin disease.

Thalassemia:  The thalassemias are a diverse group of genetic blood diseases characterized by absent or decreased production of normal hemoglobin, resulting in a microcytic anemia of varying degree. The thalassemias have a distribution concomitant with areas where P. falciparum malaria is common.

Tocopherol:  Any of several fat-soluble, oily, phenolic compounds with antioxidant vitamin E activity.

Vitamin E:  An essential fat-soluble vitamin. As an antioxidant, helps protect cell membranes, lipoproteins, fats and vitamin A from destructive oxidation. It helps protect red blood cells and is important for the proper function of nerves and muscles. For Vitamin E only, 1mg translates to 1 IU.

Vitamin K:  Helps the blood clot when the body is injured.