The Analyst™

Comprehensive diagnosis of your symptoms

Healthy

  Multiple Vitamin Need  
 
Search treatments and conditions
Conditions that suggest it | Contributing risk factors | Other conditions that may be present | Recommendations

 

A general multiple vitamin supplement may address several of your nutrient needs. This is discussed further in the treatment section.
 

 
 

Conditions that suggest Multiple Vitamin Need:
 
 
Nutrients  Supplementation Need

Risks

  Increased Risk of Alzheimer's / Dementia
 Alzheimer's disease has become more common in the past fifty years and is believed to be the result of a combination of factors, including the aging population, genetics and environmental factors. Growing epidemiological evidence suggests that diet may be one of those environmental factors with associations being reported between the occurrence of Alzheimer's and high saturated fat, consumption, and low vitamin and mineral consumption. [Bipolar News Jan. 2006]
 
 

Risk factors for Multiple Vitamin Need:
 
 
Addictions  Current Smoker
 Smoking depletes vitamins E, C, A and some of the B vitamins.

  Alcohol-related Problems
 An interesting study showed significantly decreased levels of anxiety among a group of alcoholics treated with megavitamins. Over a 21-day period, the group took approximately 3gm of vitamin C, 3gm of niacin, 600mg of B6, and 600 IU of vitamin E per day. A comparison group received only inert gelatin capsules. None of the subjects in either group took antidepressants or antianxiety drugs. Anxiety levels among both groups were measured three times over the 21 days. They fell dramatically only in the group on megavitamin therapy.

Diet

  Need for Dietary Improvement

Counter-indicators:
  A Healthy Diet

Supplements and Medications

  Past multiple vitamin supplement use
 There's a long-standing debate among nutrition and health experts when it comes to answering the question, "Do we need to take vitamin supplements?" One clear fact amongst all the confusion is that “Where western diet and farming practices go, chronic disease soon follows.”

One hundred years ago diet alone would have been sufficient to obtain adequate amounts of nutrients. Apart from increased individual requirements, it is still possible today, but more difficult. Many today believe that optimal health, not just adequate health requires careful diet planning and the use of organically grown foods. Modern farming techniques have led to soil depletion when farmers constantly replenish the soil with nitrogen and phosphates, but do little to replace the minerals that are being removed. Plants need these minerals to produce the vitamins they naturally contain. As a result, vegetables no longer contain the vitamin content they once did.

There is no substitute for the health effects that can be gained by a varied and healthy diet. But how many people do you see who routinely consume devitalized or highly sweetened foods for the sake of convenience and pleasure?

Supplementation may be necessary to bring our nutritional standards back to the level of our forefathers, to insure against any nutrient dependencies any individual may have, and to make-up for our often poor choice of foods.


Counter-indicators:
  Multiple vitamin supplement use
 There's a long-standing debate among nutrition and health experts when it comes to answering the question, "Do we need to take vitamin supplements?" One clear fact amongst all the confusion is that “Where western diet and farming practices go, chronic disease soon follows.”

One hundred years ago diet alone would have been sufficient to obtain adequate amounts of nutrients. Apart from increased individual requirements, it is still possible today, but more difficult. Many today believe that optimal health, not just adequate health requires careful diet planning and the use of organically grown foods. Modern farming techniques have led to soil depletion when farmers constantly replenish the soil with nitrogen and phosphates, but do little to replace the minerals that are being removed. Plants need these minerals to produce the vitamins they naturally contain. As a result, vegetables no longer contain the vitamin content they once did.

There is no substitute for the health effects that can be gained by a varied and healthy diet. But how many people do you see who routinely consume devitalized or highly sweetened foods for the sake of convenience and pleasure?

Supplementation may be necessary to bring our nutritional standards back to the level of our forefathers, to insure against any nutrient dependencies any individual may have, and to make-up for our often poor choice of foods.

Symptoms - Food - Beverages

  (High) coffee consumption
 Research has shown that drinking coffee causes a significant loss of several vitamins and minerals, including vitamins B and C, calcium, iron, and zinc.
 
 

Multiple Vitamin Need suggests the following may be present:
 
 
Addictions  Alcohol-related Problems
 An interesting study showed significantly decreased levels of anxiety among a group of alcoholics treated with megavitamins. Over a 21-day period, the group took approximately 3gm of vitamin C, 3gm of niacin, 600mg of B6, and 600 IU of vitamin E per day. A comparison group received only inert gelatin capsules. None of the subjects in either group took antidepressants or antianxiety drugs. Anxiety levels among both groups were measured three times over the 21 days. They fell dramatically only in the group on megavitamin therapy.

Diet

  Need for Dietary Improvement
 
 

Recommendations for Multiple Vitamin Need:
 
 
Diet  Caffeine/Coffee Avoidance
 Research has shown that drinking coffee causes a significant loss of several vitamins and minerals, including vitamins B and C, calcium, iron, and zinc.


Not recommended:
  Therapeutic Fasting
 Major nutritional deficiencies may best be corrected prior to the start of a lengthy fast. Supplementation during a fast is also a possibility.

Vitamins

  Multiple Vitamin Supplement
 
 


KEY
Weak or unproven link
Strong or generally accepted link
Proven definite or direct link
Strongly counter-indicative
May do some good
Likely to help
May have adverse consequences







GLOSSARY

Alzheimer's Disease:  A progressive disease of the middle-aged and elderly, characterized by loss of function and death of nerve cells in several areas of the brain, leading to loss of mental functions such as memory and learning. Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia.

Anxiety:  Apprehension of danger, or dread, accompanied by nervous restlessness, tension, increased heart rate, and shortness of breath unrelated to a clearly identifiable stimulus.

Calcium:  The body's most abundant mineral. Its primary function is to help build and maintain bones and teeth. Calcium is also important to heart health, nerves, muscles and skin. Calcium helps control blood acid-alkaline balance, plays a role in cell division, muscle growth and iron utilization, activates certain enzymes, and helps transport nutrients through cell membranes. Calcium also forms a cellular cement called ground substance that helps hold cells and tissues together.

Chronic:  Usually Chronic illness: Illness extending over a long period of time.

Gram:  (gm): A metric unit of weight, there being approximately 28 grams in one ounce.

Iron:  An essential mineral. Prevents anemia: as a constituent of hemoglobin, transports oxygen throughout the body. Virtually all of the oxygen used by cells in the life process are brought to the cells by the hemoglobin of red blood cells. Iron is a small but most vital, component of the hemoglobin in 20,000 billion red blood cells, of which 115 million are formed every minute. Heme iron (from meat) is absorbed 10 times more readily than the ferrous or ferric form.

IU:  International Units. One IU is 1/40th (0.025) of a microgram (mcg).

Milligram:  (mg): 1/1,000 of a gram by weight.

Mineral:  Plays a vital role in regulating many body functions. They act as catalysts in nerve response, muscle contraction and the metabolism of nutrients in foods. They regulate electrolyte balance and hormonal production, and they strengthen skeletal structures.

Niacin:  (Vitamin B-3): A coenzyme B-complex vitamin that assists in the breakdown of carbohydrates, fats and proteins. Essential for the health of the skin, nerves, tongue and digestive system. It is found in every cell of the body and is necessary for energy production. Niacin is also needed for DNA formation.

Saturated Fat:  A type of fat that is readily converted to LDL cholesterol and is thought to encourage production of arterial disease. Saturated fats tend to be hard at room temperature. Among saturated fats are animal fats, dairy products, and such vegetable oils as coconut and palm oils.

Vitamin B6:  Influences many body functions including regulating blood glucose levels, manufacturing hemoglobin and aiding the utilization of protein, carbohydrates and fats. It also aids in the function of the nervous system.

Vitamin C:  Also known as ascorbic acid, Vitamin C is a water-soluble antioxidant vitamin essential to the body's health. When bound to other nutrients, for example calcium, it would be referred to as "calcium ascorbate". As an antioxidant, it inhibits the formation of nitrosamines (a suspected carcinogen). Vitamin C is important for maintenance of bones, teeth, collagen and blood vessels (capillaries), enhances iron absorption and red blood cell formation, helps in the utilization of carbohydrates and synthesis of fats and proteins, aids in fighting bacterial infections, and interacts with other nutrients. It is present in citrus fruits, tomatoes, berries, potatoes and fresh, green leafy vegetables.

Vitamin E:  An essential fat-soluble vitamin. As an antioxidant, helps protect cell membranes, lipoproteins, fats and vitamin A from destructive oxidation. It helps protect red blood cells and is important for the proper function of nerves and muscles. For Vitamin E only, 1mg translates to 1 IU.

Zinc:  An essential trace mineral. The functions of zinc are enzymatic. There are over 70 metalloenzymes known to require zinc for their functions. The main biochemicals in which zinc has been found to be necessary include: enzymes and enzymatic function, protein synthesis and carbohydrate metabolism. Zinc is a constituent of insulin and male reproductive fluid. Zinc is necessary for the proper metabolism of alcohol, to get rid of the lactic acid that builds up in working muscles and to transfer it to the lungs. Zinc is involved in the health of the immune system, assists vitamin A utilization and is involved in the formation of bone and teeth.